Day 1: Angkor wat, Bayon and Ta prohm

As the first ray of sunshine sets upon Siem Reap, the streets fills up with locals as they get ready for the day to come, children on their bicycle on their way to school. A little girl smiles and waves at me as I drive past in the tuk tuk to gaze upon the sunrise at Angkor Wat, I wave back and enjoy the crisp morning air.

 

This majestic ancient site has been on my bucket list ever since my craving for traveling set in. Siem reap is the closest city to Angkor Wat and a first stop in Cambodia for most, because of the close proximity of the temples of Angkor. There are several ways to explore the temples, either by bicycle, tuktuk or moto. If you are very sporty, in it to save some money, and don’t mind breaking a sweat more than what you will when you do the temple tour, then bicycle is a great option. For me I knew I wanted the three day pass to explore the farthest part of the temple tour, which is 50km away from Siem Reap. During the day the sun is pretty strong, and the heat felt relentless. After two temples, a lot of climbing and walking around, I felt like I could pass out any time. So if you know that you don’t do to well with the asian heat, then suck it up and pay the price for the tuk tuk driver. For me that was 70 dollars and 3 days of driving around. Most tuk tuk drivers will charge you 15-20 dollars per day, but every now and then people have been stood up by their driver because they found a better deal. So if you want someone to be loyal you better pay the price.Β After all he will give up his entire day to drive you around and just wait for you to gaze upon temples.

The price for the temple tours has gone up for the first time in 25 years, and the price had of course doubled by the time it was my turn. A 3 day temple tour now came at the stiff price of 62 dollars. Yikes! Every ticket is printed out with a picture of your face, that you must have on you at all times, because they check your ticket before entering any temples. Wandering around without a ticket will cost you 100 dollars, and ain’t nobody got money fo dat!

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I know, I look gorgeous in this photo. Any picture taken of me for ID cards, student cards, and tickets like this, I always look slightly retarded. The price for the temple tour is very expensive yes, but totally worth it because the whole area is massive! One day is not nearly enough time to cover that much ground, I mean unless you are some kind of super human immune against dehydration, fatigue caused by the sun and all that.

Day 1:

First stop – Angkor WatP1040225P1040231.JPGfullsizeoutput_2696P1040294P1040291So this little bugger stole my bag of chips.. I was sitting by the entrance, minding my own business, and then this little guy came up behind me and started playing with the tag on my backpack. Didn’t give it much thought, and honestly I had forgotten all about how sneaky these little bastards can be. Plus I was enjoying the attention. All of a sudden he reaches into my backpack and starts digging around, I got up to make him let go, buuuut he clings on, standing on my back and he went for it. But karma is a bitch, because another monkey stole the bag of chips from him. Hah! That’s what you get!

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Second stop – BayonΒ P1040332P1040336P1040340P1040341

Third stop: Ta prohmP1040596P104060619807238_1698242540203228_1545524077_o19814282_1698242543536561_528316579_oTried to take a selfie with the tree famous in Tomb Raider, but everyone was blocking my view, so yeah.. Enjoy my gorgeous head.

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There was a 4th stop to Ta keo, buut that you will have to wait to see for when I’m done editing my Gopro video πŸ™‚

 

One thought on “Day 1: Angkor wat, Bayon and Ta prohm

  1. The biggest and most spectacular of all the temples at Angkor. It’s also said to be the largest religious monument in the world. It has a moat and an outer wall that stretches for 3.6 kilometres.

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